Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Classroom Notes

Greetings!

Lewis Art Night is right around the corner on May 4th from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. Your kid has the opportunity to be a docent in charge of explaining one of our pieces of art during Art Night. I am extending docent sign-up through this Friday, April 28th. It is always a fun night! 

Our next field trip is scheduled for Friday, May 19th. We will visit the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center to learn more about Oregon history related to the story of people of Japanese descent before, during, and after World War II.  Please return the field trip forms included with today’s Classroom Notes on or before Wednesday, May 3rd. 

State testing is moving along. We are now into the second of the four tests. This test has kids reading some passages and then writing an essay over the course of several days. I have been working to keep most of our usual routines in motion; however, our days are more fragmented as testing and testing direction time gets inserted into the mix. Kids who have opted out are continuing to work on some independent activities during our testing time.

Also this week, we mailed letters to our pen pals in Madison, Wisconsin, and continued the Write_On Challenge. For math, kids have been learning about perpendicular, intersecting, and parallel lines. They have practiced finding reflective symmetry on shapes and plotting reflections over an axis. They have also practiced plotting points on a coordinate grid. We even have some new décor on our windows… spring kites featuring drawings of kids’ favorite things about spring.

Mark

How to Make a Flip Book

“A flip book is a book with a series of pictures that vary gradually from one page to the next, so that when the pages are turned rapidly, the pictures appear to animate by simulating motion or some other change. Like motion pictures, they rely on persistence of vision to create the illusion that continuous motion is being seen rather than a series of discontinuous images being exchanged in succession; this is also known as the phi phenomenon. Rather than "reading" left to right, a viewer simply stares at the same location of the pictures in the flip book as the pages turn. The book must also be flipped with enough speed for the illusion to work, so the standard way to "read" a flip book is to hold the book with one hand and flip through its pages with the thumb of the other hand. The German word for flip book—Daumenkino, literally "thumb cinema"—reflects this process.” (From Wikipedia)



Flip Book Examples






Materials

-stack of sticky notes
-bull clips
-pencil


Tips for Making Your Own Flip Book

1 - Choose your subject. You could animate a character such as a stick figures, person, animal, or object. What would you like to see move? A ball bouncing? A slam dunk? A ship sinking? A bird flying? A tree falling? A letter going into a mail box? A bird returning to a nest with a wiggly worm? What interests you?
2 - Be sure to keep your sticky notes together using the bull clips. This will help the sheets flip crisply.
3 - Begin with the bottom sheet of the pad. Draw your figure or object using pencil. 
4 - Turn to the next sheet (the second from the bottom) and see your original drawing through the sheet. Draw a small change in the figure or object. As with your zoetrope and praxinoscope animations, the changes from sheet to sheet should be small. If you have drawn a setting element, such as a tree, basketball hoop, or half-pipe on your first sheet, be sure to carry it from sheet to sheet by tracing. This will help your setting remain stationary.
5 - Repeat this process for each sheet, making small incremental changes to the figure or object.
6 - From time to time test your animation to see if the outcome is what you are wanting. If you need to make changes, go back and erase and try again.
7 - Enjoy your flip book!

Friday, April 21, 2017

Praxinoscope Animations: Moray McLaren - We Got Time



How to Make a Praxinoscope

"The praxinoscope was an animation device, the successor to the zoetrope. It was invented in France in 1877 by Charles-Émile Reynaud. Like the zoetrope, it used a strip of pictures placed around the inner surface of a spinning cylinder. The praxinoscope improved on the zoetrope by replacing its narrow viewing slits with an inner circle of mirrors, placed so that the reflections of the pictures appeared more or less stationary in position as the wheel turned. Someone looking in the mirrors would therefore see a rapid succession of images producing the illusion of motion, with a brighter and less distorted picture than the zoetrope offered." (From Wikipedia)



Materials

-blank disc with pre-measured frames
-pencil
-Sharpie

Tips for Making Your Own Praxinoscope

1 - Think of simple shapes to draw. A dot could get bigger and bigger with each frame. A line could rotate like the hands of a clock or wag back and forth like a dog's tail. A smile on a face could turn into a frown.
2 - Make a practice copy of your 10-frame animation sequence in your sketchbook.
3 - Draw the extremes of the motion first and separate them with four empty frames. Go back and draw gradual changes in the frames between your key drawings.

4 - Arrange the frames in a clockwise sequence or so that they can work in either direction. The edge of the disc is the top and the center of the disc is the bottom of each frame.
5 - Keep in mind that your animated sequence repeats itself in the praxinoscope. It's a cycle. The drawing in the first frame follows the one in the tenth frame directly. The difference between these frames should be small.
6 - Draw in pencil first. Conference with Mr. Mark at any time and before you go back over your lines with Sharpie.
7 - Insert your disc into the praxinoscope. Spin and enjoy your animation!

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Masstransiscope



Masstransiscope by Bill Brand, from MTA Arts & Design: "A disarmingly simple artwork, placed in the unused subway station at Myrtle Avenue in 1980, has been restored. Masstransiscope turns the subway into a movie machine, presenting a colorful, animated "moving picture" to commuters as the train moves through the tunnel. With heavy cleaning by volunteers, the artwork became visible again in 2008.

“The artwork has been viewed by millions of commuters from subway cars leaving the northbound platform of the DeKalb Avenue station on the express track. The 228 hand-painted panels are viewed through a series of vertical slits set into a specially constructed housing that runs the full 300' length of the old station. The piece works on the principle of the Zoetrope, a 19th century optical toy.

"The movement of the train passing in front of the exhibition creates the illusion of a 20-second animated movie. In a regular movie the film passes through a projector to create an illusion of motion and the audience sits still. With Masstransiscope it is the audience that moves while the film stays in place."


Multiplication Check-In

Write_On Challenge Check-In

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Classroom Notes

Greetings!

The first of the English language arts portions of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium test consumed much of our Monday morning. I have no way of knowing how kids scored; results won’t be available for months, but I do know how they approached the task. They were serious. They were focused. They used the strategies we had talked about in the week preceding the test.  Testing will continue during most mornings this month. Kids who have opted out will continue working on some independent activities during our testing time. 

This past week, we had a wonderful field trip to the Oregon Historical Society. There is plenty more to see there, and you can do so for free as a Multnomah county resident. The Write_On Challenge to write 30 letters in 30 days of April continues. During math, kids practiced measuring angles and more multiplication strategies. Here’s the link to the multiplication strategies we have been using. Thank you for your continued practice with multiplication fact fluency at home. 

Looking ahead, Lewis Art Night is on May 4th from 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. Please complete this form to sign up to be a docent in charge of explaining one of our pieces of art during Art Night. A flyer about sign-up went home last Monday. Please sign up by Wednesday, April 26th.

Lastly, please remember to bring a cereal box for Reed Science tomorrow. (And any extras for other kids, if you have ‘em.)

Mark


How to Make a Zoetrope

"A zoetrope is one of several pre-film animation devices that produce the illusion of motion by displaying a sequence of drawings or photographs showing progressive phases of that motion. The name Zoetrope was composed from the Greek root words zoe, ‘life’ and tropos, ‘turning'’

"The zoetrope consists of a cylinder with slits cut vertically in the sides. On the inner surface of the cylinder is a band with images from a set of sequenced pictures. As the cylinder spins, the user looks through the slits at the pictures across. The scanning of the slits keeps the pictures from simply blurring together, and the user sees a rapid succession of images, producing the illusion of motion." (From Wikipedia)



Zoetrope Examples (From Eye Think, Inc.)





Materials

-blank strip with pre-measured frames
-pencil
-Sharpie


Tips for Making Your Own Zoetrope (From Eye Think, Inc.)

1 - Think of simple shapes to draw. A dot could get bigger and bigger with each frame. A line could rotate like the hands of a clock or wag back and forth like a dog's tail. A smile on a face could turn into a frown.
2 - Draw the extremes of the motion first and separate them with five empty frames. Go back and draw gradual changes in the frames between your key drawings.
3 - To animate a metamorphosis, or one thing transforming into something else, draw your first image in frame one and the image you will transform it into in frame seven. Use the frames between one and seven to draw the gradual changes of the metamorphosis. You can copy these "in betweens" in reverse order in frames eight through eleven to complete the cycle.
4 - Keep in mind that your animated sequence repeats itself in the zoetrope. It's a cycle. The drawing in the first frame follows the one in the twelfth frame directly. The difference between these frames should be small.
5 - Draw in pencil first. Conference with Mr. Mark at any time and before you go back over your lines with Sharpie.
6 - Insert your strip into the zoetrope, Make sure it is the right side up with images facing the center of the drum. Slide the bottom edge of the strip into the narrow trough inside the drum. Spin the zoetrope clockwise and enjoy your animation!