Thursday, May 12, 2016

Democracy Now!: Seven Decades Ago the U.S. Detained 120,000 Japanese Americans, Could It Happen Again?

We have been learning Oregon history about the story of people of Japanese descent before, during, and after World War II. We recently visited the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center to learn more about Japanese American history. This video from Democracy Now!, a news program about world and U.S. events, continues our conversation about "Why does this matter now?"

As you watch, please complete an Information/Questions/Connections sheet. You will use your notes when we come back together as a team to talk about what we learned.


From Democracy Now!: "As Secretary of State John Kerry visits Hiroshima, Japan, site of the 1945 U.S. nuclear attack which killed 140,000 people, most of them civilians, we turn to another choice the United States made during its fight against Japan in World War II—the decision to imprison 120,000 Japanese Americans in internment camps across the U.S.—and ask: Could something like this happen again? The 2016 presidential campaign has been marked by calls from Republican candidates to create a database of all American Muslims and to have the police patrol Muslim neighborhoods. Cruz’s proposals came after Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump told Time magazine last year he did not know if he would have supported or opposed Japanese-American internment camps had he been a leader during World War II. We speak with Richard Reeves, an award-winning journalist and the best-selling author of several books, most recently, "Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese-American Internment in World War II," and with Karen Ishizuka, a third-generation American of Japanese descent. She was the curator of the nationwide exhibit called 'America’s Concentration Camps: Remembering the Japanese-American Experience.' Her latest book is titled 'Serve the People: Making Asian America in the Long Sixties.'"

1 comment:

  1. Thank you for using Democracy Now! programs to teach our children.

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